Without mobilization, we fail

When I teach Perspectives, I often use the analogy of telling my kids to clean the kitchen (or other chore rooms).
We can talk about cleaning the kitchen. We can make lists of all the things that need to be cleaned. We can envision how nice the kitchen will be when it is clean. We can decry the dangers of a dirty kitchen. We can read a book about how to maximize our efficiency in cleaning the kitchen.
But none of these things actually clean the kitchen.
It requires picking up a washrag, broom, dustpan, etc., and getting to work.
Without mobilizing workers and actually preaching the Gospel and making disciples – we the task of the Great Commission will not be finished.
Inspiration, list-making, prayer and reflection, warnings, what have you – all of these things are good and even necessary. But if we mistake these things for the actual work of mobilization, deployment, and labor, we make a critical and fatal error.
Listen to Paul:

How can they call on him to save them, unless they believe in him?
How can they believe if they have never heard?
How can they hear unless someone tells them?
How will anyone go and tell without being sent?

For the Great Commission to be finished, ekklesias must intentionally mobilize, send, and tell. If we don’t have intentional plans and intentional execution of those plans, we will fail to finish.